Comic book

Review: X Rocker Chair with Bluetooth Sound

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The single object in my office that people notice the most is my X Rocker 0287401 Executive Office Chair with Bluetooth Sound. . If you’re going to be spending more than 8 hours a day sitting down, make sure you have a good one, and this one does the trick. It feels great, it looks awesome, and with the Bluetooth speakers built into the back of the headrest, you have fantastic sound any way you turn. I’ve spent plenty of time over the years with cheap chairs that hurt my back, but I’ve actually taken naps in this one. Everyone asks me where I got it, and Amazon is the place!

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Review: Artcraft Tracing Light Pad

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I've had a variety of light boxes over the years, and this is the best and least expensive one I've owned. One of the best things about it is that it generates no heat while you're working on it! The LED lighting is bright, has two intensity settings, and runs off the same power cord as most Android phones. It’s super-lightweight and wafer thin, about the size of a magazine. Small rubber pads on the back allow it to be placed right on my drawing table, so I don’t have to change my drawing posture while tracing an image. I've used it for tracing reference poses for comic drawings, and also transosing a pencil drawing onto a comic artboard so I can ink it on better paper. Beats the heck out of the big box units! Check it out!

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Sketchbook is now Available!

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My 98-page sketchbook is now available for purchase. You can pick it up from me at a convention or store appearance, or through my online store here. I don't have a digital version of it available yet, but I plan to get that out sometime in the future. Ka-Blam did an amazing job with the printing, as always, with this being my first time publishing a bound book rather than a stapled comic. The book is available for $3 off the standard cover price for an Eclipse sale!

This is a collection of various art projects from the last thirty five years of my artistic career. Some of them were done as practice pieces, some were gallery images, and some were the start of comic book ideas that never fully developed or eventually morphed into something else. Most of them were done in between various projects I’ve worked on that were published, or while working for someone else. This book is by no means a collection of my best work. It’s simply a printed version of where I was at various points in time with my art, and a way to share with people all of the pieces that had never been published. There are still plenty of items that didn’t make it into this book, but this collection was what I figured were sharable with the world.

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Review: Apple Pencil

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The Apple Pencil has become my MVP comic book art tool for 2017. Combined with the iPad Pro, it gives me incredible control, versatility, and style.It also has untethered me from my desktop and laptop computers and allows me to have greater mobility and flexibility about when and where I do my artwork. It's also nice for the note-taking application. You can write and scribble just as easily as you can draw on it. It's much more than a simple stylus.

I've used a Wacom tablet and stylus for years and this doesn't even compare. Drawing and painting directly on the screen and being able to zoom in and rotate make it a much more natural tool. The Apple Pencil has a perfect weight, feeling solid in your grip. It holds a charge for many hours, outlasting even the iPad. If the battery does get low, it only takes a few minutes to go from empty to an hour of usage. There isn't much in the way of settings. You just pop the cap off the back and plug it into the iPad's charging port and it connects via Bluetooth and begins charging.

 

Combined with the ProCreate app on the iPad Pro, it comes close to the drawing and painting capability you can get with Adobe Photoshop. The pressure sensitivity is amazing, and I can easily create many brush widths and densities while painting and drawing. I've even been able to make use of some of my old pen & paper drawing tools, such as French curves and circle templates. The relation to the old school items is pretty uncanny.

I've had to learn to be careful with it. It's not a regular pencil, but I've treated it like one. I stuck it in my back pocket and then got into the car and heard it crack. It was only the plastic near the back end, and it still works fine, but I did mess it up. I wrapped tape around the end of it, so the charging port doesn't pop out and it's got full functionality. It's not as pretty as it once was, but I didn't wreck it enough to justify buying a new one yet. I also left it on the pew in church once and luckily found it still sitting there the next day. It's a little heavy to stick behind my ear, so I'm still looking for a safe and secure spot to stow it when not in use.

In closing, the Apple Pencil is a tool I use almost daily. It's one of those things I would have to replace immediately if I lost or broke mine. It's completely changed the way I do comic book drawing, and I don't think I'll ever work the same way again. I can't recommend it highly enough. I got mine at Amazon with Prime and free overnight shipping.

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Store Appearance – St Petersburg

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Jeff Whiting will be doing an in-store signing appearance at the new Comics & Hobbies location in the Tyrone Square Mall, in St. Petersburg, Florida, on Thursday, June 22nd, from 3 – 7 pm. He’ll be selling and signing copies of Extraterrestrial, Cancer Man & Gout Boy, and Shanghai. He’ll also sign any copies you bring of the Tick, and books he worked on from the Malibu Ultraverse. Also appearing will be Roland Mann, editor from many of the Malibu books, and writed of a story that appeared in the first issue of Extraterrestrial.

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Sketchbook Available Soon!

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The Jeff Whiting Sketchbook is a 98-page collection of various art projects from the last thirty five years of my artistic career. Some of them were done as practice pieces, some were gallery images, and some were the start of comic book ideas that never fully developed or eventually morphed into something else. Most of them were done in between various projects I’ve worked on that were published, or while working for someone else.

Ever since I was a teenager, I’ve been fascinated with the artform of comic books. I’ve been privileged to work on books like the Tick for NEC, many of Malibu’s Ultraverse books, and a smattering of pages for DC Comics. I got into the field professionally during the big comics boom in the 90s. When the industry contracted and it became harder to get work from the major publishers, I started tinkering with the idea of self-publishing my own work. With some of the recent advances in printing and funding resources, it’s become much easier to get more of my own work out there. I started thinking about some pieces I had started and wanted to revisit them to see if there were worth developing again.

While searching for some of my older artwork, I realized that it was randomly scattered in places that only I knew about. Some of them were in boxes in a closet, some pieces were on old CD ROMS in desk drawers, some were on my computer’s hard drive. There was no single place that held everything I had worked on over the years. While reviewing it, I realized that most of that art had never been seen by more than a handful of people, if anyone at all. I had this large, jumbled collection of images created over my lifetime that most people never even knew existed or had forgotten about, and I figured that should be corrected.

This book is by no means a collection of my best work. It’s simply a printed version of where I was at various points in time with my art, and a way to share with people all of the pieces that had never been published. There are still plenty of items that didn’t make it into this book, but this collection was what I figured were sharable with the world.

Some of it was created digitally. For many years I’ve explored software like Poser and DAZ Studio that incorporates 3D models, lighting and textures. I’ve published a few books using this technique, and much of what’s in this book reflects all of the experimenting I did to get the process to the point I have it at today. There are some hand drawn pieces as well, most of which were done in the 90s, when bad-girl art was all the rage. I even included a few fractal images I played around with, which are patterns generated by mathematical equations.

So, all that being said, thank you for taking the time to explore my work, and I hope you find something you enjoy. Here’s to the next thirty five years!

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Brick House Comics

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Good news, everyone! This website is now the complete hub for all comics published by Brick House Digital. We’ve taken the core from the Extraterrestrial site and modified it to now cover everything we put out, so rather than having to go to a bunch of individual sites to find out what’s going on, we’ll cover all of them right here. Last year we put out the first issue of Extraterrestrial, a few weeks ago we published Cancer Man & Gout Boy, and in a few weeks we’ll publish the new version of Shanghai. We’re also releasing a 98-page sketchbook from Jeff Whiting that is currently at the printers. On the horizon we want to get some second issues out for each of these series.

We’ve also combined the Facebook pages for each individual book into a single company page, so followers will be able to find out more information  and have to visit fewer sources.

This new site will take shape over the next few days and have more details about all of our books. We have a few summer convention appearances coming up as well, where you’ll be able to purchase books and get them signed.

Stay tuned!

Comic Books

Working on the next issue of ET

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We’ve been busy getting ready to move into a new studio in the Daytona Beach, Florida area, and one of the things we’re excited about is being able to publish comic books more often. I think there are only a few reward fulfillments left to do from our first Kickstarter, and we’re going to be gearing up soon to do it again.

I have an outline written for book 2 and am fleshing it out into a full script. This book will be slightly different, as I’m planning to move to more of a hand-drawn look and feel for the next story. I’ll still continue the 3D version, but I want to try out a more traditional feel and see how that goes over. At the conventions this past summer, more people were excited about actual pen on paper forms of art, and I’m open to experimenting with finding the best vehicle to tell the story. All of the characters and settings are the same. They’ll just be presented in a slightly different form.

One of the advantages of hand drawn art is that there are no limits to what I can show. When working with 3D, I have to models for the characters, props, and sets. If I don’t have something, I have to purchase it or create it, which can be costly and time-consuming. Often, I have to compromise on a character or object, going with a pre-made version, rather than creating something from scratch. There is no suck restriction with putting pen to paper, however, so that’s one of the prospects I’m most excited about.

There are also some great new coloring tools available that I want to take advantage of. I’m seeing a program called Procreate available on iPad that has produced some stunning images, and there are quite a few creators using it to produce professional colored comic book pages.

So, the sky is no longer the limit, and exciting things are coming!